The art of letter writing and sending out mail with a beautiful stamp may be a bit old-fashioned, yet it is still a lovely way to communicate.

The Prison Library Project is honoring this tradition by having a mail art exhibition in October 2012 and is inviting inmates, families and those who look to improve the lives of incarcerated friends and family to participate in this unique fundraiser.

The show is titled Postmarked and was inspired by colorfully decorated envelopes from inmates across the country requesting books and dictionaries. These inmates use an envelope as a creative canvas to share their art.

Postmarked is using the show as a way to remember and reconnect with the magic of mail and lovely postage stamps. The show also is helping the prison population, often an unheard group, share their art in the only medium that they can – with envelope, letter and pen.

“Mail may get worn or torn through the mail, but the handling process is an important part of the theme,” says organizer, Rachel McDonnell

Participants who create the art fore the Postmarked show, can paint, stamp, collage, print, decorate or construct as creativity dictates. Only the side with the official USPS Postmark/barcode will be displayed. The art must be created on an envelope and mailed in to become part of the Postmarked mail art exhibit.

All entries must be postmarked by September 30th, 2012.

Send submissions to:

Postmarked 2012

Prison Library Project

112 Harvard #303

Claremont, CA 91711

All proceeds from the fundraiser will benefit the Prison Library Project. 

For more views on envelope art – please read more here. 

About Christopher Zoukis, MBA

Christopher Zoukis, MBA, is the Managing Director of the Zoukis Consulting Group, a federal prison consultancy that assists attorneys, federal criminal defendants, and federal prisoners with prison preparation, in-prison matters, and reentry. His books include Directory of Federal Prisons (Middle Street Publishing, 2020), Federal Prison Handbook (Middle Street Publishing, 2017), Prison Education Guide (PLN Publishing, 2016), and College for Convicts: The Case for Higher Education in American Prisons (McFarland & Company, 2014).

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