PrisonEducation.com, Prison Law Blog’s sister website, is in the process of updating a text which profiles various correspondence education programs that prisoners can enroll in. The text — “Education Behind Bars,” which I authored — has been substantially revised and will be published in a different form in 2014 by Middle Street Publishing, the nonprofit parent organization of both PrisonEducation.com and PrisonLawBlog.com.

If you work with or know of any, correspondence education programs that can be completed entirely through the U.S. Mail, please email Rondi at EducationForPrisoners(at)Yahoo(dot)com.*1 Rondi is assisting in the process of compiling this information and would appreciate your assistance in this project. She’s interested in receiving information concerning college studies (religious, graduate, and undergraduate), high school, vocational/career, paralegal, Bible study, and other correspondence education programs which do not require access to a computer or the internet, only paper-based correspondence education programs which can be completed entirely through the U.S. Mail.

The Prison Law Blog thank you in advance for your assistance with this needed project. By bringing correspondence education programs to our attention, we will be able to better disseminate this information to the prison population. And through this knowledge, more prisoners will be able to enroll in educational programs to better prepare themselves for the day of their release.

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*1-Replace the “(at)” with “@” and “”(dot)” with a period. This is a spam reduction technique.

About Christopher Zoukis, MBA

Christopher Zoukis, MBA, is the Managing Director of the Zoukis Consulting Group, a federal prison consultancy that assists attorneys, federal criminal defendants, and federal prisoners with prison preparation, in-prison matters, and reentry. His books include Directory of Federal Prisons (Middle Street Publishing, 2020), Federal Prison Handbook (Middle Street Publishing, 2017), Prison Education Guide (PLN Publishing, 2016), and College for Convicts: The Case for Higher Education in American Prisons (McFarland & Company, 2014).

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