Low-security federal prisons, also known as Federal Correctional Institutions (FCIs), house the largest percentage of the Bureau’s population. Low-security FCI’s have fences and electronic security systems, a higher staff-to-inmate ratio, and tighter control over inmate movement.

Due to the size of the Bureau’s low-security population, these facilities tend to be crowded. Inmates live in a dormitory or cubicle-style settings, though some low-security institutions have a limited number of cells. Low-security federal prisons are generally safe, but the number of “less serious” inmate assaults reported in 2017 was about five times higher than that reported in minimum-security institutions.

In order to be designated to a low-security facility, a federal inmate must have less than 20 years left to serve. Sex offenders and higher-risk inmates are housed at low-security facilities. Low-security prisoners may have a history of violence, but those caught fighting, drinking, using drugs, or committing other serious infractions are generally sent to medium-security prisons.

Low Security Prisons | Federal Correctional Institutions

Federal Correctional Institutions | Low-Security Prisons

Low-security federal prisons, also known as Federal Correctional Institutions (FCIs), “[f ]eature double-fenced perimeters with electronic detection systems, mostly dormitory or cubicle housing, and a staff-inmate ratio that is somewhat higher than that of [FPCs].”

These prisons hold the greatest percentage of federal prisoners, around 38 percent. They are relatively easy and see minimal problems with gangs and violence. Absent an order from the regional director, for a prisoner to be housed n a low-security federal prison, they must have less than twenty years remain- ing on their sentence. Those who are caught fighting, drinking, using drugs, or committing other serious infractions are generally sent to medium-security federal prisons.

A chief disadvantage of being a low-security inmate is a lack of bed space. With only forty-five institutions serving a huge population, inmates designated to or transferred to a low-security facility might wait several months for placement. The tradeoff for the relatively relaxed atmosphere is the likelihood of being assigned to dormitory-style housing where privacy is at a minimum due to communal bathrooms and shower facilities.

List of Low-Security Prisons | Low-Security Federal Correctional Institutions

  • CI Adams County (MS)
  • FCI Aliceville (AL)*
  • FCI Allenwood (PA)
  • FCI Ashland (WV)
  • FCI Bastrop (TX)
  • FCI Beaumont Low (TX)
  • CI Big Spring (TX)
  • FCI Big Spring (TX)
  • FCI Butner Low (NC)
  • FCI Coleman Low (FL)
  • CI D. Ray James (GA)
  • CI Dalby (TX)
  • FCI Danbury (CT)
  • FSL Danbury (CT)*
  • FCI Dublin (CA)*
  • FCI Elkton (OH)
  • FSL Elkton (OH)
  • FCI Englewood (CO)
  • FCI Forrest City Low (AR)
  • FCI Fort Dix (NJ)
  • CI Great Plains (OK)
  • FSL Jesup (GA)
  • FCI La Tuna (TX)
  • FSL La Tuna (TX)
  • FCI Lompoc (CA)
  • FCI Loretto (PA)
  • CI McRae (GA)
  • FCI Miami (FL)
  • FCI Milan (MI)
  • CI Moshannon Valley (PA)
  • FCI Oakdale 1 (LA)
  • FCI Petersburg Low (VA)
  • CI Reeves 1 & 2 (TX)
  • CI Rivers (NC)
  • FCI Safford (AZ)
  • FCI Sandstone (MN)
  • FCI Seagoville (TX)
  • CI Taft (CA)
  • FCI Tallahassee (FL)*
  • FCI Terminal Island (CA)
  • FCI Texarkana (TX)
  • FCI Waseca (SD)*
  • FCI Yazoo City Low (MS)

*Prisons housing only female inmates.

**Facilities housing both male and female inmates.