The trend by states moving to reject life sentences without the possibility of parole for juvenile offenders continued this year when the Washington State Supreme Court ruled the practice unconstitutional on October 18. In State of Washington v. Brian Bassett, the court noted that states were “rapidly abandoning” the practice, since youth are “less criminally…

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By Christopher Zoukis Tyrone Grayson was on parole after serving a 20-year sentence for attempted robbery and a consecutive 10-year sentence for unlawful possession of a firearm when he committed another offense. He was charged and received a new 12-year prison term, then ordered to serve the balance of his 20-year sentence by the parole…

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By Dianne Frazee-Walker Dietrick Mitchell is just one of four dozen men in the Colorado Department of Corrections serving life without parole as adults in prison —sentenced when they were juveniles.  Mitchell is now forty-years-old, but can easily be spotted in the prison yard with his awkward boyish looks. Tragically, men who were sentenced into…

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By Dianne Frazee-Walker 25-year-old Kyle has lived in Salida, Colorado most of life. He has also been involved with the court system for almost half of his life. His first brush with the law occurred at age 14 for just being a kid. Riding a dirt bike was the gateway to his path of being…

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By Dianne Frazee-Walker Prior to the March murder of Colorado corrections chief Tom Clements by parolee EvanEbel, there were many warning signs that monitoring bracelets were not properly functioning. Ebel was a parolee, who wore an ankle bracelet.  He tore off his ankle bracelet and went on a shooting spree killing Clements and Nathan Leon, an innocent pizza…

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After spending time in prison, ex-offenders can often find it difficult to find employment. Social, personal and vocational skills need to be re-learned and applied to life outside of prisons. 

The California New Start Prison Program is a statewide program designed to help inmates and parolees become involved in a network of of employment possibilites. this program is not mandatory for prisoners – it is a voluntary program that your counselor can prepare you for as you near your release date. 

Numerous statistical studies demonstrate that a parolee who finds and maintains a steady job – and who also has stable housing and avoids substance abuse – is more likely to avoid subsequent offenses and to successfully complete his term on parole.

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