A rogue police officer from the Edison, New Jersey police department has been sentenced to 20 years in prison following his guilty plea to a string of violent offenses, including the firebombing of his boss’s house. Michael Dotro was an Edison cop for 10 years before his arrest and conviction. During that time, according to…

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The New Jersey Supreme Court issued a ruling on July 25, 2017 in which it granted qualified immunity to a police officer accused of a police-created “exigent circumstances” search. But in the process of doing so, the Court put police officers statewide on notice that such searches are constitutionally impermissible and will not be tolerated…

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BY SYDNEY GAYDA / NEWJERSEYNEWSROOM.COM  https://www.prisonerresource.com/prison-education/Image courtesy forbes.com

 The New Jersey Scholarship and Transformative Education in Prisons Consortium (NJ-STEP) is revolutionizing how inmates will integrate back into society after their release.  College-level classes, now offered to prisoners during their incarceration, are expected to offer “an invaluable boost to incarcerated students, help reduce the rates of recidivism and, cut public spending,” according to NJ.com.

“First launched in 2012, the program is being expanded through a $4 million in grants Rutgers received from The Fort Foundation and The Sunshine Lady Foundation.”  The program has now expanded to seven correctional facilities across the state.  At the Albert C. Wagner Correctional Facility in Bordentown, NJ, a select group of young inmates are taking classes in mostly every subject- from medieval history to sculpture.  Once released, inmates are  able to redeem their credits at “Mercer County Community College, Rutgers University and several other state institutions.”

Bridget Clerkin, for The Times, reported earlier this week that results of the program have been “positively extraordinary”.  Recent research done by the Rand Corporation indicates that “inmates who participate in correctional education programs are 43 percent less likely to go back to prison. And employment after release is 13 percent higher among prisoners who participated in either academic or vocational education programs.”

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